1999-2005 Hyundai Accent Horn Will Not Work

New and Old Horns Compared
New and Old Horns Compared

I recently failed the Missouri safety inspection because the horn on my 2005 Hyundai Accent will not work.  I am really uncomfortable driving a car in the city without a horn but I had not even noticed that it did not work yet so I was anxious to figure out what was wrong and fix it.  Follow along and see how you can troubleshoot your Accent’s horn if it doesn’t work.

1999-2005 Hyundai Accent Horn Will Not Work – Troubleshooting and Replacement Steps

Equipment:

Tools Needed:

Parts Needed:

Step 1: Check the horn fuse and relay.

The fuse for the horn is located in the engine compartment fuse box:

Engine Compartment Fuse Box Location
Engine Compartment Fuse Box Location

There is a spring-loaded metal catch on the front and back of the lid that holds it on:

Fuse box lid tab locations
Fuse box lid tab locations

I would pry the back one away from the lid and lift up on the back of the lid:

Prying away the top fuse box lid tab
Prying away the top fuse box lid tab

Then repeat for the front tab and remove the lid.  The diagram of the fuse box is on the lid:

Horn fuse and relay locations
Horn fuse and relay locations

Check the fuse by looking for a continuous “u” wire bridge between the legs of the fuse (if it is good):

Good Fuse Example
Good Fuse Example

One sign of a bad relay is discolored (yellowed) plastic on the relay.  Mine looked good:

Horn Relay
Horn Relay

Step 2: Check the voltage at the horn.

The horn is located between the grill and the radiator:

Hyundai Accent Horn Location
Hyundai Accent Horn Location

I disconnected the horn’s connector.  On my Toyota Sienna there is only one wire in the connector because the ground wire connects via the bolted connection to the body of the van but this vehicle has a separate wire for the ground connection.

Horn Electrical Connector
Horn Electrical Connector

I then connected my multimeter (on DC volts setting) to the connector by stripping the ends of two short pieces of wire, inserting them each into the connector, and connecting them to my multimeter:

Connecting Multimeter to Horn Connector
Connecting Multimeter to Horn Connector

I then positioned my multimeter so I could see the display when I pushed the horn button on the steering wheel.  Pardon my poor focus, but you can see on the multimeter display that it was reading 13.09 volts at the horn’s connector–it must be a bad horn!

The voltage at the horn connector was 13 volts
The voltage at the horn connector was 13 volts

Step 3: Replace the horn.

The horn is held in place by one 10-mm bolt on the top of the horn’s flange:

Removing the single horn bolt
Removing the single horn bolt

It is actually easier to remove the electrical connector after you have unbolted the horn:

Press the tab on the electrical connector to remove it
Press the tab on the electrical connector to remove it

Step 4: Bolt the new horn in place.

I double-checked that I have the correct replacement horn, check:

New and Old Horns Compared
New and Old Horns Compared

Bolt the horn in place using your 10-mm socket and ratchet.

Step 5: Reconnect the electrical connector.

It can only go on in one orientation so you cannot connect it incorrectly.  Now you can pass your Missouri vehicle safety inspection!

My shiny new horn installed
My shiny new horn installed
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